Signal or Telegram: who’s a better guardian of your privacy?

I am offering you the following without any conclusions on my own, so make your call.

A few days ago one of the founders of Signal messenger (Moxie Marlinspike) has started claiming that Telegram is worst or equal than infamous Whatsapp and FB’s Messenger in terms of security and encryption. His reasons show all but familiar tactics of turning facts inside-out to fit the narrative (i.e. https://twitter.com/moxie/status/1474067551785144327).

Claims likes this are actually addressed in Telegram’s FAQ where it explains how how they split encryption keys between the geos in order to make it nearly impossible for any single country to get access to the content of even not end-to-end encrypted chats). Also, you might want to check this for more in-depth explanations https://telegra.ph/Why-Isnt-Telegram-End-to-End-Encrypted-by-Default-08-14.

But just today I came about this analysis of the history of Signal https://yasha.substack.com/p/signal-is-a-government-op-85e exposing Moxie’s possible connections to NSA and perhaps other agencies. Which won’t be very surprising for a guy who headed the encryption team at Twitter.

Anyway – judge for yourself and feel free to forward it around if you think this is helpful.

Cool FOSS’ heads prevail once again

As you have seen in my last post or elsewhere, Facebook has recently added a dubious patent clause in the license of  multiple projects including ReactJS. And predictably, a number of organizations, companies, and open-source advocates made it clear that it’s way too dangerous to keep on using the code with such restrictions because of possible legal repercussions.

Well, I am pleased to tell to all my readers, that they have back-tracked on this after Apache Foundation, WordPress, and many others have express their clear intention of switching to safe alternatives to React.js and other frameworks from FB, or banning their use. As you all know, FOSS is a free market ecosystem; it is thriving from the forces of intellectual competition, always offering multiple choices to its users. And this approach won again: facing the danger of loosing their user base and, effectively, rendering themselves irrelevant, they made the decision to, once again, re-license some of their projects under MIT.

Namely, ReactJS will be released under the new license. So if you are using it – make sure to update your dependencies to v.16 once it is out next week. Remember, re-licensing isn’t usually retroactive, so don’t fall into that trap.

Disclaimer: I am not using, planning nor recommending to use any Facebook’s sponsored projects

And let the Dao be with you, as usual 😉